Conversations: Where Are The Women In Global Politics?

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Showings

Mary D. Fisher Theatre Wed, Dec 11 7:00 PM
Film Info
Event Type:Conversations Series
Discussion and Q&A
Run Time:90 minutes (approximately)

Description

The Sedona International Film Festival is proud to announce the third program in its "Conversations" series for the 2019/2020 season. The speakers are all distinguished faculty members from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff with outstanding reputations in their disciplines.  Using a conversational format, the speakers will address controversial ideas, issues and topics, followed by Q&A. Please join us for an evening of intellectual banter, compelling discussion, and in some cases controversial dialogue. 


"Conversations" next event is on Wednesday, Dec. 11 at 7 p.m., the third in the season’s series at the Mary D Fisher Theatre. The featured speaker is Sheila Nair PhD and her topic is "Where Are The Women In Global Politics?". 


Women are important actors and agents in global politics. Yet the ways that they matter and their influence are frequently overlooked or marginalized not only in scholarly analyses of global politics, but importantly, in foreign policy and public policy. We should thus ponder “where are the women” in this context. Challenging popular perceptions about how the mere presence of women leaders is impactful, Dr. Nair takes up a wide-ranging conversation about how we may better understand the less visible ways that women shape global politics while simultaneously addressing global gender disparities and power inequities.  She will also address on-going efforts to advance gender equality in a global context.
 

“Thus, to investigate the gendered workings of international politics we will have to make power visible—power in all its myriad forms. This exploration can be uncomfortable” (Cynthia Enloe, Bananas, Beaches and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics, 2014)



Dr. Sheila Nair
Dr. Nair is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. Additionally, she was the Director of Women's and Gender Studies at the university from 2014 to 2017.  She has written and published on various topics, including postcolonial feminism, and governance and international aid. She is co-editor of and contributor to two books, “International Relations and States of Exception: Margins, Peripheries, and Excluded Bodies” (2010); and “Power, Postcolonialism and International Relations: Reading Race, Gender and Class” (2004). She is presently at work on a monograph about memory and mass violence in Vietnam and Cambodia.


Future "Conversations" series programs will include:
• January 15: Myths of the Bible Your Teacher Didn't Discuss
• February 11: Sex, Intimacy, and the Senior Citizen
• March 18: Global Warming
• April 15: Not Your Guru"s Buddhism
• May 20: Power Politics and US China Relations

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