Louis Armstrong's Black & Blues

Showings

Mary D. Fisher Theatre Fri, Oct 28 4:00 PM
Mary D. Fisher Theatre Sat, Oct 29 4:00 PM
Alice Gill-Sheldon Theatre Sun, Oct 30 6:30 PM
Mary D. Fisher Theatre Mon, Oct 31 4:00 PM
Alice Gill-Sheldon Theatre Tue, Nov 1 6:30 PM
Alice Gill-Sheldon Theatre Thu, Nov 3 6:30 PM
Film Info
Event Type:Documentary Feature
Release Year:2022
Run Time:104 minutes
Rating:R
Production Country:United States
Original Language:English
Trailer:https://youtu.be/o5jbSeBHVTQ
Cast/Crew Info
Director:Sacha Jenkins

Description

Experience an unprecedented look into the life of the founding father of jazz. You’ve heard his influential music, now hear his incredible story.


Never-before-heard personal recordings and archival footage tell the story of Louis Armstrong’s life from his perspective. From musical phenom to civil rights activist to world-renowned artist, this illuminating film shows sides of Armstrong few have seen.


This definitive documentary, directed by Sacha Jenkins, honors Armstrong's legacy as a founding father of jazz, one of the first internationally known and beloved stars, and a cultural ambassador of the United States. The film shows how Armstrong’s own life spans the shift from the Civil War to the Civil Rights movement, and how he became a lightning rod figure in that turbulent era.


With the full support of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, the filmmakers have access to a treasure trove of rare archival materials, including hundreds of hours of audio recordings, film footage, photographs, personal diaries, and a life’s worth of ephemera for exclusive use in the first significant documentary dedicated entirely to his life.


“A revealing glimpse of an American Icon. A delightful experience for jazz buffs.” — John DeFore, The Hollywood Reporter


“A legend comes to life. A doc that will make you appreciate Armstrong, the man.” — Christian Blauvelt, IndieWire


“This essential documentary goes deep on the life and art of the jazz legend using Armstrong’s own words.” — Brian Truitt, USA Today