Toronto Arthouse Film Festival Day 2 at 9pm

Showings

Fox Theatre Wed, Oct 20 9:00 PM
Film Info
Release Year:2021
Rating:NR
Social Media
Website:https://www.torontofilmfestival.org/program

Description

All guests attending screenings of the Toronto Arthouse Film Festival are required to have a ticket for entry due to the assigned seating model in place to regulate social distancing in the theatre. Tickets and seats can be reserved online ahead of time, or can be reserved at the box office upon arrival to the screening(s). A ticket must be reserved for each event if attending more than one screening. Groups of individuals wishing to sit together must book all tickets/seats in one transaction in order to be seated together.

 

Due to the vaccine passport mandate coming into effect on September 22nd, all guests attending will be required to show their proof of vaccination and photo ID upon arrival. 

 

This screening session will be hosted by Johanna Schneller and features 6 films. All films are English spoken and/or English subtitled.

 

The Armor (France)

By David Fitt

Several women reflect on their daily lives. Running time: 00:01:00

 

(Settler) Land Acknowledgement (Canada)

By Kalina Nedelcheva

“The video documents a walk from my home to Trinity Bellwoods that I make frequently to manage anxiety levels during the lockdown(s). It traces my steps and my throughs through a combination of poetic reflection and disruptive visuals that honor the histories of the land that are still present today. The cinematography purposefully denotes the cyclicality of my movements, as well as the repetition and cyclicality of time. The shots are sporadic, but balanced and symmetric, reflecting my feelings in a chaotic state of solitude. The billboard is part of Gallery TPW’s project MOVEMENTS. The photograph is part of a series titled Piliutiyara (2019) by Inuvialuk artist Kablusiak that “deconstructs the sexualization of Indigenous women and femmes by making viewers hyper-aware of the settler-colonial gaze.” I pay homage to it because I am the colonial gaze and I recognize that I need to strive to do better. I also turn to it to say I am sorry as it is the only Indigenous labor I see around me at the time of my walk.” Running time: 00:05:50

 

Duckman (Canada)

By Kaixin Aethelu Wang

Happiness doesn’t come bundled with a new car, or a big house. It comes with finding your purpose in life and surrounding yourself with smiling friendly faces. Duckman is a Japanese busker who travels around the world to bring happiness to people. This movie explores the difficulties of living as a busker and how he balances his passions vs career as we know that living off as a busker deals with various dangers/problems whilst having the passion—busking—is treasurable just like all the others who have passions in life. Running time: 00:10:16

 

Cass & Lex (Germany)

By Phillip Kaminiak

In his directorial debut, Berlin and Mexico City-based cinematographer Phillip Kaminiak embarks on a personal project where he attempts to deal with his previous relationships by training a lens on real-life couple Cassandre Clerc and Johannes Lex. By documenting their lives and translating their relationship into Dance, CASS & LEX tells a poem about the beauty and the horror of love. Running time: 00:04:47

 

I Feel Uncomfortable on the Balcony (Canada)

By S.W. Jafar

A man ponders the cycle of his vices alone on a snowy balcony warmed only by cigarette smoke. Running time: 00:05:09

 

In Ashes (Norway)

By Kjetil Engh Aasen

The life of Inger and her son Jonas is turned upside down when the man they thought they knew is suspected of unspeakable crimes against children. As painful questions arise, Inger realizes her son is slowly pulling away from her. Inger struggles to find a way back to her son, while at the same time, attempts to deal with her own conflicting feelings towards her husband. Running time: 01:23:48