Invisibles, The (Die Unsichtbaren)

Claus Räfle | 2017 | 110 min | Germany | English subtitles

Showings

Bowtie Great Neck Squire Cinemas (Aud 2) Sun, Nov 11 7:30 PM
Film Info
Type of Film/Event:Drama
Jewish Interest
World Cinema
Release Year:2017
Running Time:110 minutes
Premiere Status:Long Island Premiere
Production Country:Germany
Original Language:German
Subtitles:English
Cast/Crew Info
Cast:Max Mauff
Alice Dwyer
Ruby O. Fee
Director:Claus Räfle
Producer:Frank Evers
Claus Räfle
Jörg Schulze
Screenwriter:Alejandra López
Claus Räfle
Cinematography:Jörg Widmer
Editing By:Julia Oehring
Extra Search Properties
Date Search:Sun. 11/11
Venue:Bow Tie - Great Neck
Connect With The Film
Website:https://www.menemshafilms.com/invisibles
Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/MenemshaFilms

Description

At the time when Berlin was declared “Jjudenfrei” (officially “free of Jews”) in 1943, there were about 7,000 Jews still secretly residing in the capital of the Third Reich. They survived by hiding in attics, basements, warehouses, and sometimes disguised in plain view walking among their fellow Germans. Using an assemblage of personal interviews, fictionalized re-enactments, and archival footage, The Invisibles is a gripping documentary/narrative hybrid about the inspiring resourcefulness, resiliency, and courage shown by teenagers and young adults living in dire conditions with an uncertain future.

The inventive structure of the film allows us to hear the stories of four survivors, as compellingly told in their own words, and then to see the action dramatically depicted by a talented cast. Hanni Lévy, a homeless woman who goes to the movie theater every day for safety and escapism, Eugen Friede is a 16-year-old who is sheltered by communist families and joins the resistance, Ruth Arndt finds work as a maid and nanny for a sympathetic Nazi colonel, and brilliant art student Cioma Schönhaus (Max Mauff from Bridge of Spies, in a starmaking turn here), learns to expertly forge passports for other Jews. Cinematographer Jörg Widmer (Pina) beautifully captures the look of 1940s Berlin and brings the dramatizations to vibrant life.


Q&A after the film with Lawrence Gumpel, son of Ruth Arndt


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